The scientific program at ISMP started today and I planned to write a small personal summary of each day. However, it is a very intense meeting. Lot’s of excellent talks, lot’s of people to meet and little spare time. So I’m afraid that I have to deviate from my plan a little bit. Instead of a summary of every day I just pick out a few events. I remark that these picks do not reflect quality, significance or something like this in any way. I just pick things for which I have something to record for personal reasons.

My day started after the first plenary which the session Testing environments for machine learning and compressed sensing in which my own talk was located. The session started with the talk by Michael Friedlander of the SPOT toolbox. Haven’t heard of SPOT yet? Take a look! In a nutshell its a toolbox which turns MATLAB into “OPLAB”, i.e. it allows to treat abstract linear operators like matrices. By the way, the code is on github.

The second talk was by Katya Scheinberg (who is giving a semi-planary talk on derivative free optimization at the moment…). She talked about speeding up FISTA by cleverly adjusting step-sizes and over-relaxation parameters and generalizing these ideas to other methods like alternating direction methods. Notably, she used the “SPEAR test instances” from our project homepage! (And credited them as “surprisingly hard sparsity problems”.)

My own talk was the third and last one in that session. I talked about the issue of constructing test instance for Basis Pursuit Denoising. I argued that the naive approach (which takes a matrix {A}, a right hand side {b} and a parameter {\lambda} and let some great solver run for a while to obtain a solution {x^*}) may suffer from “trusted method bias”. I proposed to use “reverse instance construction” which is: First choose {A}, {\lambda} and the solution {x^*} and the construct the right hand side {b} (I blogged on this before here).

Last but not least, I’d like to mention the talk by Thomas Pock: He talked about parameter selection on variational models (think of the regularization parameter in Tikhonov, for example). In a paper with Karl Kunisch titled A bilevel optimization approach for parameter learning in variational models they formulated this as a bi-level optimization problem. An approach which seemed to have been overdue! Although they treat somehow simple inverse problems (well, denoising) (but with not so easy regularizers) it is a promising first step in this direction.